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Saturday, July 11, 2020 | History

2 edition of Report of the Navajo-Hopi Relocation Commission found in the catalog.

Report of the Navajo-Hopi Relocation Commission

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Indian Affairs.

Report of the Navajo-Hopi Relocation Commission

hearing before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, Ninety-sixth Congress, second session, on P.L. 93-531 ... May 20, 1981, Washington, D.C.

by United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Indian Affairs.

  • 352 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by U.S. G.P.O. in Washington .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Arizona.
    • Subjects:
    • Hopi Indians -- Land tenure.,
    • Hopi Indians -- Relocation.,
    • Navajo Indians -- Land tenure.,
    • Navajo Indians -- Relocation.,
    • Indian land transfers -- Arizona.,
    • Indian reservations -- Arizona.

    • Edition Notes

      ContributionsNavajo and Hopi Relocation Commission.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsKF26.5 .I4 1981t
      The Physical Object
      Paginationiv, 287 p. :
      Number of Pages287
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2999349M
      LC Control Number84601798

      History: The Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation (ONHIR), initially known as the Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation Commission, was created by Congress in , to promote a comprehensive settlement of the land disputes between the Navajo and Hopi Native American tribes, which can be traced back to the establishment of a reservation in for the Hopis, .   A brief summary of activities of the Senate's Select Committee on Indian Affairs from April to September is presented in this report along with a status report on more than 30 of the bills which have been referred to the committee (James Abourezk, chairman).

      The Commission's report is a masterful summary of events surrounding the wartime relocation and detention activities, and a strong indictment of the policies that led to them. The report and its recommendations were instrumental in effecting a presidential apology and monetary restitution to surviving Japanese Americans and members of the Aleut. As an example, the first finding in the report states, “Because the Navajo-Hopi Relocation Act falls within the scope of human rights violations under the standards of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission recommends P.L. et al., be repealed. Navajo lands.

      Congress created the Navajo Hopi Land Commission in to resettle those families. It was later replaced by the Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation, which was .   Congress approves the Navajo Hopi Land Commission’s (later replaced by the Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation) relocation plan, which had a five-year deadline. The deadline.


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Report of the Navajo-Hopi Relocation Commission by United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Indian Affairs. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Report and Plan--Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation [Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation Commision] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Pages, HardcoverAuthor: Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation Commision.

The Commission's report is a masterful summary of events surrounding the wartime relocation and detention activities, and a strong indictment of the policies that led to them.

The report and its recommendations were instrumental in effecting a presidential apology and monetary restitution to surviving Japanese Americans /5(16).

the report explores several overarching themes covered during the consultation that transcend the agenda topics, including the importance of gathering accurate data for the Navajo Nation and the need for the Navajo government to inform its citizens about how. At this time, the Navajo-Hopi Indian Relocation Commission (NHIRC) was created to move the Navajos and Hopis who were forced to relocate.

The NHIRC is a federal agency based in Flagstaff, Arizona, and comprises the majority of this collection. Interim Progress Report, Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation Commission. Publisher: [Place of publication not identified]: Flagstaff: Navajo and Hopi Relocation Commission, and Hopi Indian Relocation Commission (NHIRC) funded a study on ground-water quality in the Puerco River basin prior to relocation of Navajo Indians into the area south of Sanders and Chambers, Arizona.

Conflicting results from studies funded by NHIRC (Western Technologies, Inc., ) and Arizona Department of Health Services () and a study byCited by: 7. Commission on Civil Rights report; Authorizing appropriations for the Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation Commission [microform]: report (to Navajo-Hopi relocation program [microform] / United States General Accounting Office, Resources, Communi.

Our report provides background on the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act and activities authorized by the Act, as well as up-to-date information on the status of ONHIR' s relocation activities and the work that remains to be completed.

As of Decemberthe Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation, and its predecessor agency (collectively, ONHIR), has relocated 3, Navajo and 27 Hopi families off disputed lands that were partitioned to the two tribes and provided new houses for them.

The idea that this relocation was caused by a land dispute between the Navajo and Hopi people is a distortion reality, a diversion created by business interests in order to gain access to the land and its energy sources.

Article copyright Cultural Survival, Inc. Settlement and accommodation agreements concerning the Navajo and Hopi land dispute: hearing before the Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Fourth Congress, second session, on oversight hearing on the proposed settlement and accommodations agreements between the Department of Justice.

Report of the Navajo-Hopi Relocation Commission: hearing before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, Ninety-sixth Congress, second session, on P.L.

Washington, D.C. The law established the Navajo and Hopi Relocation Commission to carry out the relocation process, and instructed that the process be completed 5 years after Congress approved a relocation plan submitted by the Commission. Because this plan was approved by Congress inthe relocation process should have been completed by July 7, Imposed by the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act ofthe relocation was intended to be a temporary process to resolve land disputes among the tribes that had been ongoing for decades.

But discord between varying involved parties continued to arise, preventing the desired final resolution. Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission. Public Hearing Report: The Impact of the Navajo–Hopi Land Settlement Act of - P.L.

et al. July 6, Full text of "Phase-out of the Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation: hearing before the Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Fourth Congress, second session, on to amend the act commonly known as the "Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act of ," SeptemWashington, DC" See other formats.

In response to a congressional request, GAO prepared a fact sheet on the Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation Commission's activities, including: (1) the number of Indian families to be relocated; (2) a breakout of the actual and estimated relocation costs; (3) the Commission's replacement-home benefits levels; and (4) the most recent Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA).

Professionally converted for accurate flowing-text e-book format reproduction, this is the complete official version of the Report of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians, Personal Justice Denied, issued in Decemberalong with the Commission's recommendations, issued in June   Provides a schedule for the Navajo-Hopi Relocation Commission to report to the appropriate congressional committees on the progress of the land transfer program.

Directs that payments being made to any State or local government on lands transferred under this Act shall continue to be made as if such transfer had not occurred. The cloud hanging over the relocation effort was summed up in a recent report by the House Subcommittee on Interior and Related Agencies.

The report has been widely read by critics of relocation as a dawning of awareness in Congress that the full-scale removal of unwilling Navajos cannot go : Iver Peterson.

The Commission s report is a masterful summary of events surrounding the wartime relocation and detention activities, and a strong indictment of the policies that led to them. The report and its recommendations were instrumental in effecting a presidential apology and monetary restitution to surviving Japanese Americans and members of the Aleut.Navajo-Hopi dispute settlement agreement-in-principle: hearing before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, first session, on the views and concerns of the people of northern Arizona regarding the Navajo-Hopi agreement-in-principle, FebruFlagstaff, AZ.

(Washington: U.S. G.P.O. The Hopi Tribe is supportive of Senate Billthe Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Amendments of sponsored by U.S. Sen. John McCain .