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Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

5 edition of Euripides: Phaethon found in the catalog.

Euripides: Phaethon

James Diggle

Euripides: Phaethon

by James Diggle

  • 40 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by University Press in Cambridge [Eng.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Euripides,
  • Phaethon (Greek mythology) in literature,
  • Phaethon (Greek mythology) -- Drama,
  • Tragedy

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited with prolegomena and commentary by James Diggle.
    SeriesCambridge classical texts and commentaries ;, 12
    ContributionsEuripides.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPA3978 .D55
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 243 p.
    Number of Pages243
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5443997M
    ISBN 100521077001
    LC Control Number73096084

    Read this book on Questia. Hippolytus in Drama and Myth: The Hippolytus of Euripides, a New Translation by Donald Sutherland by Euripides, Hazel E. Barnes, | Online Research Library: Questia Read the full-text online edition of Hippolytus in Drama and Myth: The Hippolytus of Euripides, a New Translation by Donald Sutherland (). Fragments of Euripides' tragedy on this subject suggest that Phaethon survives. In reconstructing the lost play and discussing the fragments, James Diggle has discussed the treatment of the Phaeton myth (Diggle ). In the True History by the satirical Roman writer Lucian, Phaëton is king of the sun and is at war with the moon.

    EURIPIDES' PHAETHON JAMES DIGGLE: Euripides, Phaethon. Pp. xi+; 6 plates. Cambridge: University Press, Cloth,?o. ONE of the most exciting discoveries of the early nineteenth century was Hase and Bekker's finding of the splendid fragments of the Phaethon contained on two leaves of the Codex Claromontanus. Gottfried Hermann, after. BOOK TWO. Phaethon: In earlier Greek mythology, Helios is the sun-god in the Odyssey, and Phaethon (meaning “bright”) is one of Dawn’s chariot horses; see also Euripides’ Medea whose last-minute rescue is on Helios’ chariot.

    3 Euripides’ Phaethon takes place before the palace of Phaethon’s assumed father—Merops, king of Ethiopia, “at the eastern edge of the world bounded by the river Oceanus (), close to. The latter relationship is a basic feature of the myth treated by Euripides in the tragedy Phaethon. What follows is an outline of the myth as found in the Euripidean version. Phaethon, the story goes, was raised as the son of Merops and Klymene.


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Euripides: Phaethon by James Diggle Download PDF EPUB FB2

Book Description Professor Diggle has examined all the manuscript evidence and offers many decipherments. He gives a text of the play and of the hypothesis, a commentary and appendices, and he discusses the treatment of the Phaethon myth in classical literature.

He also attempts a reconstruction of the plot of the : James Diggle. A tragic story of Phaethon, an illegitimate son of Euripides: Phaethon book.

An impatient and ambitious young man, Phaethon strives for higher things, but is insufficiently strong to endure the very elevation he craves.

The supreme symbol of his ambitions, the ride in the chariot of Helios 4/5. Of the fragmentary plays of Euripides, "Phaethon" is the one of which we have the most substantial chunks, as well as stray lines here and there.

Alastair Elliot's desire to "flesh out" the rest of the play is ambitious perhaps hubristically so/5(3). Description The surviving text of the fragmentary Phaethon of Euripides depends chiefly on two sources: two pages from a Euripidean manuscript, written about A.D.

Euripides: Phaethon book, and a papyrus of the third century B.C., which contains a substantial part of the parodos/5(17). Cambridge University Press, - Fiction - pages 0 Reviews The surviving text of the fragmentary Phaethon of Euripides depends chiefly on two sources: two pages from a Euripidean.

The surviving text of the fragmentary Phaethon of Euripides depends chiefly on two sources: two pages from a Euripidean manuscript, written about A.D. and a papyrus of the third century B.C., which contains a substantial part of the parodos. Buy Euripides: Phaethon by James Diggle, Europides, Euripides online at Alibris.

We have new and used copies available, in 0 edition - starting at. Shop now. Euripides. Phaethon. Bookplateleaf Boxid IA Camera Sony Alpha-A (Control) Collection_set trent External-identifier urn:oclc:record Foldoutcount 0 Identifier euripidesphaethodigg Identifier-ark ark://t03z60v96 Invoice Isbn Lccn Ocr ABBYY FineReader (Extended OCR) Old_pallet Pages: Euripides (/ j ʊəˈr ɪ p ɪ d iː z /; Greek: Εὐριπίδης Eurīpídēs, pronounced [ː.pí.dɛːs]; c.

– c. BC) was a tragedian of classical with Aeschylus and Sophocles, he is one of the three ancient Greek tragedians for whom any plays have survived in ancient scholars attributed 95 plays to him but, according to the Suda, it was 92 at most.

In classical mythology, Phaethon is the child of the sun god Helios, who tries to drive his father's chariot and is killed in the attempt. Euripides explains how this happened: Helios had seduced Phaeton's mother - already betrothed to another - and as the price of her seduction had promised to grant her a favour.

As an adult Phaethon claims the promise and asks to drive his father's chariot. This book investigates the way these questions are asked and answered by four plays that span the three decades or so in which Euripides’ extant dramas were produced (– B.C.). 2 The paradoxical answer given by the plays illuminates the postmodern response to the problem of the lost voice of truth and justice.

The most influential extant version of the story, found in Ovid’s Metamorphosis, Books I–II, seems to echo the plot of Euripides’ Phaethon, now partially known from papyrus discoveries.

Taunted with illegitimacy, Phaethon appealed to his father, who swore to. "Phaethon" is a famous tragedy by the great Greek dramatist, Euripides ( BC), which was very popular in Antiquity, but, unfortunately, has shared the fate of many other masterpieces of that time.

It was written, as is now believed, in the later period of the author's life, around BC. Euripides (c. BCE) has been prized in every age for his emotional and intellectual drama. Eighteen of his ninety or so plays survive complete, including Medea, Hippolytus, and Bacchae, one of the great masterpieces of the tragic genre.

Fragments of his lost plays also survive. Bibliography and further reading about the story of Phaethon: D’aulaire’s Book of Greek Myths, by Edgar and Ingri D’Aulaire.

Euripides: Phaethon, edited by James Diggle and others (). The main ancient source for the story is a fragmentary play by Euripides; this is a discussion of that play, with commentary on the myth, by specialists. The surviving text of the fragmentary Phaethon of Euripides depends chiefly on two sources: two pages from a Euripidean manuscript, written about A.D.and a papyrus of the third century B.C., which contains a substantial part of the parodos/5(3).

The Phaethon of Euripides and many later accounts is the son of Helios and the nymph Clymene, daughter of Oceanus; but in the earliest, almost isolated occurrence of his name his parents are Eos (Dawn) and Cephalus, and as a beautiful youth he is abducted by Aphrodite and made her temple keeper ([Hesiod], Theogony –91, cf.

Pausanias ). Buy Euripides: Phaethon (Cambridge Classical Texts and Commentaries) by Euripides, Diggle, James (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. From inside the book. What people are saying Resolutions and chronology in Euripides: the fragmentary tragedies evidence Nauck frr Nova Fragmenta Euripidea number of fragments Oidipous Oinomaos papyrus passages penthemimeral caesura Phaethon Philippides Philoktetes Phoinissai Phrixos plausible Pleisthenes POxy Prologue prologue-speech.

Euripides by Euripides,typis Hieronymi Commelini edition, in Latin Buy this book. Better World Books; Share this book. Facebook. Twitter. Pinterest.

Embed. Edit. Last edited by CoverBot. Euripides: Phaethon (Cambridge Classical Texts and Commentaries)Cambridge University Press. You can write a book review and share your experiences. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Open Library is an initiative of the Internet Archive, a (c)(3) non-profit, building a digital library of Internet sites and other cultural artifacts in digital projects include the Wayback Machine, and Euripides.

τῷ τρεῖς then a gap of uncertain length (pages missing in P), to which editors assign the following four book fragments: –9 (F ) Four fragments from later in the first episode show Merops and Phaethon exchanging their very different views of the marriage: –9 (F ) phaethon>.